More than 150 pieces of art express beauty, make cultural connections and raise awareness about the effects of trauma

Middle and high school students across Clackamas County are using more than 150 pieces of art to express beauty, make cultural connections and raise awareness about the effects of trauma.COURTESY PHOTO: CESD - 'Abdulah' by Molalla High School junior Morgan Bem??is being sent to Nigeria as part of the nonprofit Memory Project, which aims to make cross-cultural connections through art.

“Abdulah,” a portrait by Molalla High School junior Morgan Bem , is being sent to Nigeria as part of the nonprofit Memory Project, which aims to make cross-cultural connections through art.

Clackamas High School senior Helen Lendzioszek’s piece in acrylic paint and colored pencil challenges the idea that childhood trauma goes away as you grow older.

Childhood trauma, Lendzioszek said, “grows and morphs into different things as you grow.”

Dozens of regional student artists will also be using their talents to compete for scholarships. These students representing school districts throughout the county are putting their pieces on display March 28 in

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SIOUX CITY — During the late 19th century and into the early 20th century, Sioux Cityans could purchase haberdashery from the west end of T.S. Martin & Co. Department Store at 515 Fourth St. 

For much of the Great Depression and leading into World War II, fashionable ladies could meet up with friends at Kresge’s second floor luncheonette, which was housed in the same building.

Up until a few years ago, well-dressed gents could fill their closets with plenty of Ralph Lauren dress shirts and Tommy Bahama weekend apparel at the recently closed Karlton’s Men Clothiers at the very same place.

Amy Thompson knew the historical importance that the three-story Martin Block building has in downtown Sioux City. 

That’s why she and her engineer husband, Matt Thompson, selected the space for Art SUX, a gallery for area artists to create, exhibit and sell their pieces.

“We started Art SUX with

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Artist Ulysses Jenkins is seen in profile wearing a patterned hat in dramatic contrast with a white background

Ulysses Jenkins’ work has long made prescient use of technology. A retrospective at the Hammer explores a singular career.

(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

In 1981, artist Ulysses Jenkins was teaching at UC San Diego when the media faculty was asked to stage a demonstration for an open house. Jenkins says the initial idea was to set up a VCR and play a video. He had other ideas: “I said, we’re supposed to be the media department, let’s do something more advanced.”

His concept: Establish a live video link between two locations on campus — a student lounge and the media studies complex — and use them to create a two-way broadcast between each site. The feed would include student performances as well as a live lecture by media theorist Gene Youngblood (an early proponent of video art), all against a backdrop of found footage and lo-fi ’80s graphics.

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