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Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


HBO Film Tells the Story of How Gordon Parks Changed Photography – The Guardian

Gordon Parks, a groundbreaking photographer who died in 2006, is the subject of A Choice of Weapons: Inspired by Gordon Parks, a new HBO film by documentary filmmaker John Maggio.

From The Guardian:

In 1956, as the first Black staff photographer of Life magazine [worked for 20 years], he [Parks] traveled in and around Mobile, Alabama, on assignment to capture the realities of Jim Crow. He chose to shoot in color, aiming his lens at both the more vibrant and quotidian moments of Black American daily life: the church picnic, the trip to the ice cream shop, the hanging of laundry out to dry…

Aside

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Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


Art Wolfe on his Approach to Night Photography – Amateur Photographer

Leopard (Panthera pardus) in thorn tree (Vachellia sp.), Chobe National Park, Ngamiland, Botswana. The gnarled branches of an ancient thorn tree play host to a resting leopard. Canon EOS 5D, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM lens, f/5.6 for 1/500 second, ISO 400 © Art Wolfe

Art Wolfe, who just turned 70, has been capturing wildlife, landscapes and people for nearly half a century. Earlier before the arrival of COVID-19, he was out of the house for more than nine months every year.

His latest book, Night on Earth, is a wide-ranging collection of travel images made in the hours between dusk and dawn and taken in various locations worldwide,

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Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


The Singular Work of a California Photographer, Unearthed – The New Yorker

Joan Archibald, a Long Island, New York wife and mother of two, was tired of her life as a suburban homemaker in the early 60s. So, she moved to California and, in the era of increasing curiosity of Eastern culture, she changed her name to Kali, the Hindu goddess of death and time.

By the mid-to-late sixties, she began to perfect her photography and even took classes at a junior college. Kali worked by herself and did not share her work publicly. The considerable photography oeuvre that she produced was only rediscovered by her daughter, Susan, in 2016, three years before she died, at the age of eighty-seven.

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