Therese Gaughan MacKinnon enlisted in the Army in 1989 because it seemed like the best option for her  at the time.

After taking time off to complete her military training, MacKinnon was enrolled at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro as a dance and music major. A classically trained pianist, she dreamed of going to New York City and becoming a full-time musician. But midway through her fall semester, her idyll was shattered.

Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, and the United States, along with the United Kingdom, France, Egypt and Saudi Arabia, rushed to Kuwait’s aid and expelled the Iraqi forces in what became known as the Gulf War.

MacKinnon was called to duty, which she immediately answered. Setting aside her studies, she deployed to the Persian Gulf. When she returned two years later, her university told her that since she had missed out on so much, including her

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VALDOSTA – Valdosta State University Art & Design continues years-old traditions in new ways.

The annual spring senior art exhibit opens Sunday, April 18, but online rather than an in-person reception and gallery show.

“Living In Color” features works by 20 graduating art and design students. A variety of styles and artistic media will be represented, including paintings, drawings, sculptures, photography, graphic design, printmaking, book art, ceramics, jewelry and metalworking. 

“This vast array of artistic mediums and subject matter highlights the unique differences in each student and their art,” according to a statement from the students. “From the precise and meticulous drawing, to free-flowing watercolors, to raw and vibrant prints; viewers can experience many distinct types of art, sure to find art that speaks to them.”

Jadah Alford, Lo Baker, Rasheem Callender, Daniel Carter, Caroline Closson, Jennifer Delabra, Sophia Dong, Elliott Ingram, Thuy Le, Joellyn Mak, Christian Perry, Arielle

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When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged in 2020, it wasn’t only Henry Matthiessen’s art business that had to change.

The art itself needed to change as well.

Matthiessen, who owns Stoned Art Studio in Dubuque, found himself forced to close the doors of his gallery, removing the ability to show his pieces to customers in person. His custom-made stone oil lamps benefited the most from the in-person showings and were a high selling product for his business. With his store closed off from the public throughout the pandemic, Matthiessen said, interest in the lamps faded.

“If there were no showings, then I had to forget about selling a lot of stone lamps,” he said. “I had to totally rethink the plan for my business.”

The pandemic forced many local artists to adapt their art and business model in order to survive. For Matthiessen, that adaptation came from spending even more time

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ROCKTON — A lost art is being revived at Hononegah High School thanks to Career Technology and Education Department (CTE) teacher Rebecca Robinson’s photo 1 class, which includes darkroom photography.

Not only are students learning the logic behind camera settings but are discovering the beauty of stopping, slowing down and thinking. For Robinson, it’s a necessary education in today’s changing world.

“We are losing the art of thinking for ourselves,” Robinson said.

As part of the class, students use manual cameras which only accept film. By not having an automatic setting on the cameras, students learn to understand the aperture, shutter speed and sensitivity of film or ISO.

All photographs produced in the dark room are black and white. Although color photos can be produced in a dark room, it’s a much more complicated process so the class focuses strictly on black and white photography.

“Removing the element of

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