Coastal Carolina Camera Club conducted it’s first juried digital competition on Feb. 10. The theme was 'Reflections.' Charleen Baggett was the first place winner for division B for 'Morning Light.'

Coastal Carolina Camera Club conducted it’s first juried digital competition on Feb. 10. The theme was ‘Reflections.’ Charleen Baggett was the first place winner for division B for ‘Morning Light.’

New to Brunswick County? Interested in photography? Captivate by the coast?

Join Coastal Carolina Camera Club, while capturing the beauty that the coast has to offer while meeting people who also share the same interest.

Coastal Carolina Camera Club conducted it’s first juried digital competition on Feb. 10. The theme was 'Reflections.' Mogens Hermansen won first place in division A for 'Cape Fear Twilight.'

Coastal Carolina Camera Club conducted it’s first juried digital competition on Feb. 10. The theme was ‘Reflections.’ Mogens Hermansen won first place in division A for ‘Cape Fear Twilight.’

The Coastal Carolina Camera Club, formed in 2006, is open to beginners through professionals who have an interest in the art of photography and want to share their passion and knowledge.

During the pandemic, the club had to hold meetings through Zoom, which impacted the club growth; and also saw the use of cell phone photographers.

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All romances have improbable origin stories, but few begin with such a glamorous set of incidents as the ones that brought together artists Peter Schlesinger and Eric Boman.

Schlesinger (pictured above in his ceramic studio in New York), born in 1948 in over-sunny Los Angeles to an insurance agent and a social worker, had always aimed for a life in the arts. It was while studying painting at UCLA at 18 that he met his future boyfriend David Hockney, and after graduation Schlesinger moved with the Pop icon to London to attend art school at the Slade. Meanwhile, Boman, no less a born bohemian (although his Swedish paternal line traces back through 350 years of Lutheran ministers), made his way to London in 1966 to study graphic design at the Royal College of Art.

Both exceptionally handsome and talented young men were up to their necks in a sophisticated milieu

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Artist and poet Jane Birdsall-Lander has always loved words, writing and art.

“I was that kid who read the dictionary. I know. That’s weird; and I read encyclopedias. So, when a word seems important to me, or there’s a word that tweaks my curiosity, I look it up in different dictionaries. I like to see the origin first,

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Photography has always had a relationship to haunting as it shows not what is, but what once was.

The process whereby light must bounce off the subject and back towards the camera suggests that photographs have touched and carry a trace of what is shown. Scholars of fields from anthropology to art history have explored the association between photographs and ghosts.

This association is exaggerated by spirit photography, which are portraits that visually reunite the bereaved with their loved ones — a phenomenon I attribute to the creative innovation of a Boston woman in 1861.

Modern readers may be preoccupied by the motives and methods of spirit photographers — their use of double exposure, combination printing or contemporary digital manipulation to produce semi-translucent “apparitions.” But far more interesting is the impact the resulting photographs had on the bereaved who commissioned the portraits. At heart, the Victorian interest in

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