It was negative 13 degrees Celsius (8.6 degrees Fahrenheit) when Lorelou Desjardins took a break from her workday to take a walk on the frozen lake near her home in Oslo, Norway. She was accompanied by her husband, who had recently been on four months of paternity leave, and their infant son.



a group of people standing next to a body of water: A youth prepares to jump into cold water at the Oslo harbor.


© Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images
A youth prepares to jump into cold water at the Oslo harbor.



a man riding a snow board on a body of water: Two men skate on an icy lake in Trondheim, Norway.


© Gorm Kallestad/AFP/Getty Images
Two men skate on an icy lake in Trondheim, Norway.

Not only was she encouraged by her employer to take this walk — she is paid one hour per week to exercise or spend time outdoors. It’s one of the several times she goes outdoors during the workday.

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Other times are to put her 1-year-old out for a nap, wrapped up in blankets outdoors, like they do with him and the other babies in day care,

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“When I moved to Norway, I was kind of a workaholic. And so, coming here and having my boss tap my shoulder at 5 or 6 p.m. and tell me, ‘What are you still doing at work? Go outside, it is nice weather,” she said. “It’s kind of this spirit of ‘OK, work is great, but we have a life out there, that life involves being outside.'”

Contrary to American “hustle culture,” Desjardins said overworking and sacrificing your personal life isn’t considered a good thing in Norway. It’s considered an inability to prioritize in one’s work to Norwegians.

While Americans may not be able to ask their employer for a paid walk in the forest, Desjardins said there is much to be gained from adopting these practices — and people can do it in any natural area near where they live and work.

People in Norway don’t have some magical

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How essential is an artist?

Art, you’ve noticed, has been idle.

The artist, in pandemic Chicago, has been stripped of stages, classrooms, materials. Many, who were already working two or three jobs for supplemental income, were stripped of second and third jobs. Some, seeing little light at the end of the COVID tunnel, have probably given up already.

Even a starving artist can last only so long.

And yet, remarkable as it may be seem in 2020, there was a moment, about a decade long, when this country and its White House, eager to get Americans to work, considered its artists essential.

You live everyday with that legacy.

Consider the South Side Community Art Center, an 80-year old institution in a 130-year old Classical Revival house. It rests in an unassuming lot on book profits South Michigan Avenue. It is tall and austere, warm and a bit removed from its

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COLUMBIA, SC—There’s a family making lemonade from lemons. Their lemons come in the form of idle time and their lemonade is beautiful paintings. Many of the paintings have been donated to front line professionals such as nurses, doctors, and community health workers. The rest are being sold on Etsy or, as one of the kids said, “I fall in love with many of my artworks, but realize they can bring others happiness too!”

Back in March, Mathew Morgan and Julie Smithwick, parents to Cullen, Bella, Norah, and Elias, ages 11 to 16, were forecasting what weeks of sheltering at home would look like for their family and wanted to develop a positive and safe activity balancing the fear and uncertainty permeating on newsfeeds. What came next was the evolution of a collaborative venture and the birth of a business.

TribePours is the official name of this happenstance art business surfacing

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