Tonya Delgado, 17, sat in the exhibition space at Artworks, Trenton’s downtown visual arts center, surrounded by framed photographs hanging on walls, some of them her own work.

“I’ve always been into all types of art, photography, fashion, writing poetry, all of that,” she said. “But I’ve never really gotten the chance to display or to show anything.”

Delgado is one of six students and eight mentors whose work is shown in COVID-Topia, which runs until the end of the month.

Collectively, Fábrica De Fotos, is described as “a photography club of students and mentors embodying different cultures and generations, building unity through photography.” Students meet once a week through zoom with a mentor to discuss different photography methods.

“It has given me a chance to broaden my horizons and broaden my idea of what art can do,” adds Delgado, a Trenton Catholic Academy student who has

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Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo-features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America — Lenscratch

From "Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America" University of Chicago Press, 2021
Elisa and Family © Mary Beth Meehan, courtesy University of Chicago Press. 2021
Mary Beth Meehan © Molly Heller

Acclaimed photographer Mary Beth Meehan and Silicon Valley culture expert Fred Turner join forces to give us an unseen view of the heart of the tech world.

“With arresting photography and intimate stories, Seeing Silicon Valley makes this hidden world visible,” says Aline Smithson in Lenscratch. “Instead of young entrepreneurs striving for efficiency in minimalist corporate campuses, we see portraits of struggle—families displaced by an impossible real estate market, workers striving for a living wage, and communities harmed by environmental degradation.

“If the fate of Silicon Valley is the fate of America—as

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Composition in landscape photography is of utmost importance for creating amazing photos. It is basically the way we put the objects in our frame to carve out meaningful images.

There are many rules of composition like the rule of thirds and centered compositions, but I feel that there are a lot more to that than just these rules.

Landscape photography is about perception, it is about how we can depict nature in our own way. Obviously following the rules will give us good images but breaking them will give interesting and different images. Other than rules, I have experienced a lot in composition while shooting landscapes.

Here are my top 10 most important tips for landscape photography composition.

#1. Survey: Give Some Time to the Frame Without the Camera

Give some time to the frame without the camera. Whenever I arrive at a shoot location, I always take out my

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Landscape photography has become the most ubiquitous art form of our time, thanks to smartphone technology and social media. Yet lost in the deluge of National Park selfies is an essential dilemma about our love of these natural places, and how we choose to represent them.

That dilemma is brought to light at two photography exhibitions in downtown Portland this spring, both of which challenge the legacy of Ansel Adams, the vanguard of modern landscape photography.

At the Portland Art Museum’s “Ansel Adams in Our Time” (May 5 to Aug.1) the legendary photographer is both celebrated and questioned, while modern photographer Johnnie Chatman makes a more pointed critique in his affecting show “i forgot where we were…” at Blue Sky Gallery (April 1 to May 29).

The two approach the art form from either end of the timeline. Adams, who died in 1984, began his career in the 1920s. Chatman,

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