CLEVELAND, Ohio — When it chooses topics for exhibitions, the Cleveland Museum of Art spreads its attention around the globe, from Europe and the Middle East to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. At the moment, however, it’s in a New York state of mind.

Earlier this year, it displayed a selection from Bruce Davidson’s poignant “Brooklyn Gang’’ photos that documented the lives of rebellious white ethnic teens in the New York City borough during the 1950s.

Last month, the museum followed up with two new, Big Apple-centric shows.

Beautifully organized, the exhibitions focus on 71 prints by the early 20th century Ashcan School realists, and on 44 examples of mid-century street photography — pictures snapped without the subject’s knowledge.

Emily Peters, the curator of prints and drawings, formulated “Ashcan School Prints and the American City, 1900-1940,’’ which focuses heavily on New York subjects. Photography Curator Barbara

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Artist Catherine Opie, a UCLA professor of photography for 20 years, has big ideas for the university’s art department. Among them: Reduce student debt and lower economic barriers to education.

It’s a vision Opie is in a position to start realizing: UCLA has named her art department chair, it announced on Tuesday. She steps into the role Sept. 1, taking over for artist Andrea Fraser, who has led the department since January 2018.

In 2019, UCLA announced Opie as the university’s inaugural endowed chair in the art department, a position underwritten by a $2-million gift from philanthropists Lynda and Stewart Resnick. That role is an undergraduate and graduate teaching position. The departmental chair is the lead administrative position, working with faculty and staff to develop the academic curriculum, goals and priorities of the art department.

Opie’s commitment to educational access for all students is needed “now

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Beach at Sunset, Wilder Burns

A new photography exhibit displaying the work of Brunswick High School students debuted at the Merrymeeting Plaza on Friday night.

The collection stemmed from a photography class that was taught by art educator Jennie Driscoll and was sponsored through a grant from the Maine Department of Education and the Maine Arts Commission. The class worked alongside a visiting artist from Portland.

The exhibit is hosted by Brunswick Public Arts in a space provided by the Merrymeeting Plaza and WS Development. The installation is called “How We See Now: New Dimensions of Photography.”

According to Driscoll, through various assignments the class focused on making images that push the boundaries of perception and photography, allowing to students to visualize new realities through their work.

For example, in one project students took images and cut them up to recreate sculptures and then re-photographed them while working with lighting.

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An Akron Public Schools teacher and community artist has been helping young high school artists leave their mark, guided in a yearly summer program. He’s also helped countless other young artists through his teaching, much like he was encouraged when he was a student. 

Dan Coffield, 38, has been serving as the education coordinator for the Akron Arts Lift Program for 12 years, helping Director Elisa Gargarella. 

During the school year, Coffield is an art teacher at Firestone High School in the Akron School for the Arts program. For the first two weeks after school is out, he and Gargarella work with 15 to 20 high school students from Akron Public Schools on a community project. 

Akron Public Schools:Akron Superintendent David James headed for Columbus City Schools following retirement

What is Arts lift?

Arts Lift was started 20 years ago by Gargarella as a summer resident art program. Students

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