Ilse Bing (American, b Germany, 1899-1998), “Self-Portrait in Mirrors, Paris,” 1931, printed circa 1941, gelatin silver print, 1987.14. Purchase with funds from Georgia-Pacific Corporation.

Ilse Bing (American, b Germany, 1899-1998), “Self-Portrait in Mirrors, Paris,” 1931, printed circa 1941, gelatin silver print, 1987.14. Purchase with funds from Georgia-Pacific Corporation.

Photos courtesy High Museum of Art

ATLANTA, GA. – This spring, the High Museum of Art presents “Underexposed: Women Photographers from the Collection,” an exhibition featuring more than 100 photographs from the museum’s collection, including many that have never before been exhibited. The artworks demonstrate the notable contributions of women throughout the history of photography, spanning from innovators of the medium to contemporary practitioners who investigate the intersections of photography, representation and identity.

The exhibition was conceived in conjunction with the centennial of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted suffrage for some women. It will remain on view through August 1.

“Underexposed” pays homage to the work of women who have pioneered and championed the art of photography, from its earliest days through

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In honor of Women’s History Month, the Los Angeles Times photography department would like to highlight our award-winning female staff photographers.

Francine Orr joined the Times photography staff in 2000. Previously she had been a photographer for the Kansas City Star. Raised in Colorado, she earned a bachelor’s degree in both history and art from the University of Saint Mary. Orr also joined the Peace Corps and was a volunteer in Yap, Federated States of Micronesia. While there, she learned how to be a quiet observer and gained a love for stories.

Orr’s photographic focus has been on public health and poverty issues in Africa, India, and the United States. In Los Angeles, she has concentrated on the growing homelessness crisis as well as the COVID-19 pandemic.

A few of Orr’s honors include the 2020 Meyer “Mike” Berger Award for outstanding in-depth, human interest reporting from Columbia Journalism School, a

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In 2016, photojournalist Gulnara Samoilova was running a successful wedding photography business. Her diverse portfolio of work spans two decades — with images in the permanent collections of The New York Public Library, 9/11 Memorial Museum and Houston Museum of Fine Arts — but weddings had become her staple business. By the year’s end, she’d decided to pack it in. Reaching a professional crossroads — “making money wasn’t enough,” she says — the result of the presidential election was the final push she needed.

“Trump’s behaviour triggered memories of the sexism I had experienced throughout my life, both in Russia and the United States,” she says. “I decided to channel my frustration into something positive: a platform dedicated to women street photographers, to create the kind of support I would have liked to have received in my career.” And so Women Street Photographers, initially an Instagram-based platform

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Unknown Tsuneko Sasamoto, Tokyo, 1940. Inkjet print, 2020, 18.2 cm x 18.2 cm (7 3/16 in. x 7 3/16 in.). Tsuneko Sasamoto / Japan Professional Photographers Society / The Met

Welcome to Women’s History Month, it’s that time of year where we look back on all the courageous women who have sacrificed and stood up for their rights and for the progress of women’s rights as a whole. Today March 8th, marks International Women’s Day as recognition of the global fight for gender equality, pay equity, and the liberation of women. 

Besides indulging in women’s history documentaries, watching Zoom panels and donating to Planned Parenthood, this is the time to dig in and find your next favorite women artists. What better way to celebrate feminism than with the female gaze in photography? There are two whopper retrospectives to look forward to, one at the High Museum in

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