Tonya Delgado, 17, sat in the exhibition space at Artworks, Trenton’s downtown visual arts center, surrounded by framed photographs hanging on walls, some of them her own work.

“I’ve always been into all types of art, photography, fashion, writing poetry, all of that,” she said. “But I’ve never really gotten the chance to display or to show anything.”

Delgado is one of six students and eight mentors whose work is shown in COVID-Topia, which runs until the end of the month.

Collectively, Fábrica De Fotos, is described as “a photography club of students and mentors embodying different cultures and generations, building unity through photography.” Students meet once a week through zoom with a mentor to discuss different photography methods.

“It has given me a chance to broaden my horizons and broaden my idea of what art can do,” adds Delgado, a Trenton Catholic Academy student who has

Read More

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged in 2020, it wasn’t only Henry Matthiessen’s art business that had to change.

The art itself needed to change as well.

Matthiessen, who owns Stoned Art Studio in Dubuque, found himself forced to close the doors of his gallery, removing the ability to show his pieces to customers in person. His custom-made stone oil lamps benefited the most from the in-person showings and were a high selling product for his business. With his store closed off from the public throughout the pandemic, Matthiessen said, interest in the lamps faded.

“If there were no showings, then I had to forget about selling a lot of stone lamps,” he said. “I had to totally rethink the plan for my business.”

The pandemic forced many local artists to adapt their art and business model in order to survive. For Matthiessen, that adaptation came from spending even more time

Read More

You could call it art for art’s sake — plus $1,000 a month.

San Francisco plans to start paying 130 local artists $1,000 a month starting in May through the fall in a pilot program announced on Thursday. 

It follows other so-called “universal basic income” efforts being launched in California amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“From the first day the pandemic arrived in San Francisco, we knew that this health crisis would impact artists, and artists of color in particular,” Mayor London Breed said Thursday while announcing the program, FOX 2 of the Bay Area reported.

Breed said the city’s artists “make San Francisco special, and bring so much life and energy to our city. The arts are critical to our local economy and are an essential part of our long-term recovery. If we help the arts recover, the arts will help San Francisco recover.”

OAKLAND OFFICIALS ANNOUNCE FRAMEWORK FOR GUARANTEED

Read More

BELOIT — Not even a pandemic and a snow storm could stop this year’s Black Women in Business Expo in Beloit, with the event drawing its largest number of vendors ever on Saturday.

The annual event aims to shine a spotlight on women-owned Black businesses and coincides each year with Black “Herstory” Day, an event organized by the expo’s creator Vickie Lynn to celebrate the achievements of Black women.

Businesses of all kinds were on display Saturday, from health and wellness products, clothing, books, apparel, jewelry, photography, art and more. Entry-fee donations from the event will go to the Center of Hope and New Life Ministries International in Beloit.

This year’s expo, with over 50 vendors, almost didn’t happen due to COVID-19, Lynn said. But organizers rallied to make the event socially-distanced and masks were required.

“We were really unsure about it at first, but then we came together

Read More