It was a radical concept for its time in the early 1930s: create a graduate art school program without grades, classes, degrees or even teachers.

When the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills was created nearly 90 years ago, it shunned the idea of learning from traditional professors. Instead, artists would teach other artists.

Today, the academy, founded in 1932, still operates with that same sense of hands-on instruction (though degrees are now awarded). Now, a new exhibition at the Cranbrook Art Museum pays homage to the artists and works that that unusual approach helped create.

“With Eyes Opened: Cranbrook Academy of Art since 1932” at the Cranbrook Art Museum opens to the general public Sunday and runs through Sept. 19, featuring more than 275 pieces from 225 Cranbrook Academy of Art artists, faculty and alumni.

It represents all of the academy’s programs of study, including architecture, ceramics, design,

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EDMONDS — Cascadia Art Museum opened three new exhibitions June 5 — two of which have contrasting ideas.

“Origins: Northwest Abstract Art,” focusing on the roots of abstract and non-objective art in the Northwest, “Painted with Light: Northwest Pictorialist Photography,” featuring rare photographs by Northwest masters of pictorialism, and “Gifts and Promised Gifts to the Museum’s Permanent Collections: Part II,” in celebration of the museum’s fifth anniversary, all are showing through Oct. 10.

David Martin, museum curator, explained that he paired the exhibits “Origins” and “Painted with Light” not because they go together, but because they don’t.

“They’re like opposites; they’re so drastically different,” Martin said. “I like to plan shows like that where you go from one exhibition and then you go into another that is so completely different. You get these extreme points of view.”

“Origins: Northwest Abstract Art” features abstract and non-objective art from 1920

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Of course, photographers and artists recognized the aesthetic merits of photography before the 1970s. Alfred Stieglitz began exhibiting photographs in New York in the early 1900s as part of his project of introducing modernism to America. Out West, Ansel Adams invested in the purity of the photographic image as he used his camera to capture landscapes in ways unique to the medium. In the aftermath of World War II, however, painting and sculpture were paramount, and artists’ efforts to express the inner world rather than depict the outer one left little room for the mechanical work of cameras. When Grundberg arrived in New York in 1971, that had begun to change. Andy Warhol was famous by then; artists like Robert Rauschenberg had been using photo-based techniques in mixed-media work for some time; the Museum of Modern Art’s 1972 posthumous retrospective of Dianne Arbus was a landmark event.

And something new

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A sampling of kitchen utensils made by Orran Scruggs. Scruggs is an artist both a painter and musician. He also does ceramics, creative marketing, photography, and advertising graphic work. He had always explored different artistic mediums whether acrylics, watercolors, oil, or clay. He even made jewelry for a minute. And, now, he makes and sells spoons and other wooden cooking utensils. (Jay Hare/Dothan Eagle via AP)

AP

When his favorite spatula broke, Orran Scruggs decided to recreate it from some wood he had on hand.

“I took on the task of making it myself and it came out looking really good,” Scruggs said.

Scruggs didn’t have much woodworking experience beyond helping his friend and mentor Charlie Mato-Toyela make Native American flutes. The two met at an art show and clicked. Before long, Scruggs was helping his friend make wooden flutes and taking home the leftover

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