Memphis, TN, April 06, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — On Saturday, April 10, the National Civil Rights Museum opens the fine art photography exhibition, Outside the Lorraine: A Photographic Journey to a Sacred Place featuring the work of David Katzenstein. The yearlong exhibition highlights the museum as mecca for peacemakers, a place of memory and connection during the museum’s 30th anniversary.

The collection of over 90 photos in Outside the Lorraine helps visitors identify with social issues by using fine art photography to connect to the historic place, Dr. King, movement makers, and one another. Viewers are invited to see the sparkle that lies within each print that shimmers, vibrates, and introduces people to a richer experience with fine art photography by making each piece relatable.

Outside the Lorraine offers the rare opportunity for our visitors to see themselves reflected in the artwork of one of our exhibitions,” said

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The 1965 marches, protests and demonstrations for racial justice changed Wheaton resident Bernard Kleina’s life. With one camera and two lenses, Kleina captured Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the Chicago Freedom Movement, the fight against discriminatory housing practices in Chicago. Kleina’s King images, shot in color, were acquired by the Smithsonian Museum. His photography anchors the Elmhurst Art Museum’s latest exhibit “In Focus: The Chicago Freedom Movement and the Fight for Fair Housing,” a show that reflects on historical and contemporary responses to fair housing in the Chicagoland, beginning with the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Bernard Kleina poses with his photographs on display at the "In Focus: The Chicago Freedom Movement and the Fight for Fair Housing" at Elmhurst Art Museum, March 4, 2021.

Bernard Kleina poses with his photographs on display at the “In Focus: The Chicago Freedom Movement and the Fight for Fair Housing” at Elmhurst Art Museum, March 4, 2021. (Antonio Perez/ Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune)

Post cards showing Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights marches, along with a camera used by photographer Bernard Kleina are on display at "In Focus: The Chicago Freedom Movement and the Fight for Fair Housing" at the Elmhurst Art Museum, March 4, 2021.

Post cards showing Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights marches, along with a camera used by photographer Bernard Kleina

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Claim: Photos from the civil rights movement were originally taken in color but shown in black and white to make them appear older

The Black Lives Matter movement, along with protests sparked by the death of George Floyd, have generated a wave of discussion on race in America.

One social media post in particular has attracted notable attention. It claims photographers made photos during the civil rights era in color but they were purposefully shown in black-and-white to make them appear older.

The post has amassed almost 60,000 retweets and 130,000 likes on Twitter. It then appeared on Facebook, where it has been shared more than 4,000 times.

The post consists of four color photos from the 1963 March on Washington, the 1965 Selma March and a demonstration in 1968 following the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

Although it’s unclear through what medium the user claims the

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